10 – Coffee is for Closers … and for Coaches

You have actually likely watched the iconic scene from David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross where Blake, a young hotshot from downtown with an $80,000 BMW and a holier-than-thou mindset, browbeats a room full of downtrodden salesperson. He threatens them, insults their sales abilities, and concerns their manhood. His only suggestions?

” Constantly be closing.”
While that makes for award-winning drama, it’s not what we consider efficient training.
Blake’s biggest defect as a coach – however definitely not his only one – is that he only addresses the problems without evaluating the causes. He states a lot about what to do and nothing about how to do it.
Sadly, a lot of terrible training goes on in many sales organisations due to the fact that a lot of managers resemble Blake: they might be able to make things work for themselves, however they have no concept how to teach someone else.

Nor do they do the analysis of what “is” going on versus what “should be” going on. They’re just repeating recommendations like “Constantly be closing.”

This happens for a variety of factors: managers don’t have time to coach or they have too many competing concerns. Generally, sales managers were excellent salesmen, and the presumption is made that they will also be great coaches. However as Glengarry Glen Ross shows us, an excellent salesman isn’t necessarily a great coach.

Sophisticated sales organisations establish a model of what “excellent” sales habits appears like based on what has actually shown to be effective. They train their people to observe real efficiency versus this template of outstanding habits, and to provide solid, professional feedback about the gaps between the proper way to do things and what’s currently taking place.

It is not enough simply to state “Accomplish X” – it’s much more pertinent and beneficial to teach the abilities that will achieve X. Great sales coaches know the skills that associate with success and act as diagnosticians instead of dictators.

For a good sales manager, it’s not “Always be closing,” it’s “Always be Coaching.”

This occurs for a number of reasons: managers don’t have time to coach or they have too lots of contending top priorities. More frequently than not, sales supervisors were great salespeople, and the assumption is made that they will also be great coaches. As Glengarry Glen Ross shows us, an excellent salesman isn’t always a great coach.


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