Ebook Vault - Feed https://ebookvault.biz E-book's & latest news Wed, 19 Sep 2018 22:52:26 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 https://ebookvault.biz/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/cropped-logo-smal2-32x32.pngEbook Vaulthttps://ebookvault.biz 32 32 105325265 Free E-Book Download – The Joy of Imperfectionhttps://ebookvault.biz/free-e-book-download-the-joy-of-imperfection/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 21:24:11 +0000 https://ebookvault.biz/?p=2631 Too many people are trying to be something they're not, and this grinds them down. Too many of us try to pretend to be somebody that we're not.

Maybe we're trying to impress people.
Maybe we're trying to fool ourselves into thinking that we are completely different people.

The sad part? Too many of us are not aware that this is happening. It's just something that happens on autopilot. They keep pushing forward, but ultimately, it still doesn't measure up.

Regardless of how hard they try, and regardless of how much effort they put in, they simply aren't happy, nor are they fulfilled. There's always something missing. They feel incomplete, flawed and weak.

Of course, this happens deep down inside. And oftentimes, they can't quite put their finger on it. They feel that something is missing, that something is off, but they fail to see the 800-pound elephant in the room.

Similarly, too many people suffer from impostor syndrome. Regardless of the fact they actually know what they're doing
and that they are quite competent in certain areas of their life, they still feel that they are giant frauds. They feel that they are in danger of somehow being found out.

They feel this because they are under the impression that they must be perfect all the time. They feel that they must impress people all the time.

What is the root cause of all of this? The idea of perfection. People might not be able to articulate this belief, but they definitely think and act like it.

You don't necessarily have to know the concept or the proper name of what you're going through for you to go through some sort of process or suffer certain symptoms. Regardless, people are trapped living with this idea of perfection.
Pro tip: you don't have to be perfect because no one is.

The truth is, you can't be at your best at all times. That's just not going to happen. You can't be all things to all people, nor can you have it all.

Unfortunately, too many people think they have to be perfect because they expect themselves to be perfect. They are assuming that people expect them to be perfect, so they expect themselves to be perfect, and this creates a
downward spiral.

Also, too many of us think that this striving for perfection or the appearance of perfection are genuine sources of pride.
Other people hang on to the emotional albatross of perfectionism because they think others are relying on them to be perfect. They think that other people cannot move on or live full lives until and unless they are perfect.

This training teaches you how to get out of the long shadow of wanting to be perfect. Instead, it teaches you to achieve peace within by accepting yourself fully – flaws and all.

 

[caption id="attachment_2632" align="alignnone" width="1023"]Axiology Click The Image for DIRECT Download - no OptIn or other BS[/caption]

 

The E-book can be accessed with one click from our safe and virus free GoogleDrive . (without any opt in or other Bs )

If you prefer a video version ... No Problem. We have one just go to Free Video Tutorials and Courses and ... Enjoy !

(direct link to the video course : https://videotutorials.pw/the-joy-of-imperfection-free-video-course/ )

That's all for now , Come back latter for more ..

& don't forget to have fun!

We have more ....  just give us a little time to published them all.

Until then if you have any specific interest or requests try the Live Chat ... or join our Fb Group "Helper's" ...

 

… Small favor , if you enjoyed our freebie , help us spread the word and use the sharing buttons. Thanks

=>
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Learn More Here: Free E-Book Download – The Joy of Imperfection
************************************
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Too many people are trying to be something they're not, and this grinds them down. Too many of us try to pretend to be somebody that we're not.

Maybe we're trying to impress people.
Maybe we're trying to fool ourselves into thinking that we are completely different people.

The sad part? Too many of us are not aware that this is happening. It's just something that happens on autopilot. They keep pushing forward, but ultimately, it still doesn't measure up.

Regardless of how hard they try, and regardless of how much effort they put in, they simply aren't happy, nor are they fulfilled. There's always something missing. They feel incomplete, flawed and weak.

Of course, this happens deep down inside. And oftentimes, they can't quite put their finger on it. They feel that something is missing, that something is off, but they fail to see the 800-pound elephant in the room.

Similarly, too many people suffer from impostor syndrome. Regardless of the fact they actually know what they're doing
and that they are quite competent in certain areas of their life, they still feel that they are giant frauds. They feel that they are in danger of somehow being found out.

They feel this because they are under the impression that they must be perfect all the time. They feel that they must impress people all the time.

What is the root cause of all of this? The idea of perfection. People might not be able to articulate this belief, but they definitely think and act like it.

You don't necessarily have to know the concept or the proper name of what you're going through for you to go through some sort of process or suffer certain symptoms. Regardless, people are trapped living with this idea of perfection.
Pro tip: you don't have to be perfect because no one is.

The truth is, you can't be at your best at all times. That's just not going to happen. You can't be all things to all people, nor can you have it all.

Unfortunately, too many people think they have to be perfect because they expect themselves to be perfect. They are assuming that people expect them to be perfect, so they expect themselves to be perfect, and this creates a
downward spiral.

Also, too many of us think that this striving for perfection or the appearance of perfection are genuine sources of pride.
Other people hang on to the emotional albatross of perfectionism because they think others are relying on them to be perfect. They think that other people cannot move on or live full lives until and unless they are perfect.

This training teaches you how to get out of the long shadow of wanting to be perfect. Instead, it teaches you to achieve peace within by accepting yourself fully – flaws and all.

 

[caption id="attachment_2632" align="alignnone" width="1023"]Axiology Click The Image for DIRECT Download - no OptIn or other BS[/caption]

 

The E-book can be accessed with one click from our safe and virus free GoogleDrive . (without any opt in or other Bs )

If you prefer a video version ... No Problem. We have one just go to Free Video Tutorials and Courses and ... Enjoy !

(direct link to the video course : https://videotutorials.pw/the-joy-of-imperfection-free-video-course/ )

That's all for now , Come back latter for more ..

& don't forget to have fun!

We have more ....  just give us a little time to published them all.

Until then if you have any specific interest or requests try the Live Chat ... or join our Fb Group "Helper's" ...

 

… Small favor , if you enjoyed our freebie , help us spread the word and use the sharing buttons. Thanks

=>
***********************************************
Learn More Here: Free E-Book Download – The Joy of Imperfection
************************************
=>

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2631
Just A Minute the Swedish wayhttps://ebookvault.biz/just-a-minute-the-swedish-way/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 23:51:41 +0000 https://ebookvault.biz/?p=2627
Chopin
Image caption The Radio 4 show's established host is Nicholas Parsons (left) and Paul Merton is a panel regular

Just A Minute is one of the jewels in the BBC crown - and it's been entertaining audiences on radio since 1967. But few people in the UK know its close Scandinavian cousin Pa Minuten. The show, recorded in Stockholm, started just two years after the original and sticks to the same rules - more or less.

If you're a fan of Just A Minute, attending a recording of its semi-clone in Studio 4 at Stockholm's Radiohuset is a fascinating experience. Not speaking a word of Swedish turns out not to be the total barrier you might expect.

Sveriges Radio has run Pa Minuten since 1969, apart from a break for part of the 1980s. Like the BBC, it records two half-hour programmes in a single evening in front of an enthusiastic live audience which clearly adores being there.

There are slight differences. The BBC uses Chopin's Minute Waltz as theme music whereas the Swedes plumped for one of Spike Jones' comedy numbers - and they have an on-stage organist to add further musical moments along the way. Rather than a simple bell, the panellists interrupt with a personalised comedy sound effect.

But the core of the game remains what former BBC producer Ian Messiter came up with more than half a century ago.

Clement Freud Image copyright Sveriges Radio
Image caption The Bridge writer Hans Rosenfeldt has been chairman for the past four years

Four witty panellists are given topics to speak on for 60 seconds by a chairman and they try to do it without deviation, hesitation or repeating a word. Fellow panellists interrupt when they think a rule has been broken.

The topics the Swedish panel are given are more extended than in the BBC original. They included: "My suggestions for new road-signs", "Why my right shoe and left shoe smell different" and, "Contemporary writers I'd like to hit on the jaw".

For the last four seasons the chairman has been the writer Hans Rosenfeldt (previously a panellist). He's known outside Sweden as creator of hit Scandi-noir series The Bridge and also wrote two series of ITV's Marcella.

Contemporary Image copyright Sveriges Radio

He says part of the appeal of Pa Minuten is the obvious pleasure the panel take in playing off one another. "If you listen to the early programmes from the 1970s, I think the stories were the main thing - the things the players say when they have the subject. I understand that in those days everyone met before the taping and were given the subjects. So the players could always prepare a little."

"But as we play it now, Pa Minuten is probably more about the banter. I think it's really important that it's 100% improvised - the audience in the studio can feel that and I know people sense it listening at home.

"Also I think in radio habit is important. The programme goes out at 4pm on a Saturday and we have people in the audience whose parents and even grandparents have listened to us too. It's become a bit of Swedish life."

There are few details as to how Just A Minute crossed the North Sea. From 1951 Messiter's format had existed on the BBC Light Programme, in a different form, in a programme called One Minute, Please. Messiter left the BBC and took the format with him to South African radio, where for the first time he used the title Just A Minute.

In 1967, now a freelancer, he and Nicholas Parsons persuaded the BBC to relaunch the programme on the new Radio Four. His son Malcolm Messiter recalls his father returning from a trip to Sweden in 1969 having sold the format to Sveriges Radio, the nation's public broadcaster.

David Batra
Image caption Host Nicholas Parsons (front right) with frequent panellists Kenneth Williams (back right), Derek Nimmo (back centre) and Clement Freud (back left) are joined by show creator Ian Messiter in 1969

But radio is changing as quickly as any other medium. In the interval between the two recordings (when Sveriges Radio hands out copious free coffee and cinnamon buns) audience-members from 20 to 70 are delighted to explain in perfect English how much they love Pa Minuten.

The show clearly unites the generations but a major difference in how different age groups listen to the show emerges. For those under 35 what they're attending is essentially a podcast: many don't know or really care when the show is to go out on radio.

David Batra is a stand-up comic of mixed Swedish and Indian decent who's been a panel member for almost 20 years. (His wife Anne Marie Kinberg is an MP and former leader of Sweden's Moderate Party.) Batra grimaces as he recalls, "For the first couple of years I really sucked. Eventually I got better but it's a very hard game. People often say it doesn't matter who wins but I'm not sure that's true: I think it gives structure and provides a bit of tension. When I watch a gameshow on TV and there's no system of points, I think that's less fun.

funny comedian

"The main thing with Pa Minuten is fluency - it's a real test of how your brain works under pressure. That is a very, very hard thing for anyone to control. Being a really good writer or a very funny comedian helps but there are always three good performers ready to jump in front of you."

Despite his many trips to the UK, Rosenfeldt admits he's never heard an episode of Just A Minute. So I play him an extract.

He looks thoughtful. "It's interesting that in Britain I can hear them concentrating more than we do on the story-telling. And the topics are a bit broader than the ones our producer comes up with. And your chairman is 94 and he so obviously has it under total control. That's still not the case with me from time to time."

The recordings were taking place in Stockholm just before this month's General Election in Sweden. It wasn't mentioned in the programme but it was something people were talking about. Rosenfeldt says comic series like Pa Minuten are an important part of Swedish life.

"We're on Sweden's Programme 1, which is the main speech network. But there's not a lot of humour on it - it's just us and two other series. So we are 30 minutes of pure fun with the news and current affairs all around us. It's quite good to have us to balance all the seriousness up a bit."

instagram

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Related Topics

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Source Here: Just A Minute the Swedish way
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Chopin
Image caption The Radio 4 show's established host is Nicholas Parsons (left) and Paul Merton is a panel regular

Just A Minute is one of the jewels in the BBC crown - and it's been entertaining audiences on radio since 1967. But few people in the UK know its close Scandinavian cousin Pa Minuten. The show, recorded in Stockholm, started just two years after the original and sticks to the same rules - more or less.

If you're a fan of Just A Minute, attending a recording of its semi-clone in Studio 4 at Stockholm's Radiohuset is a fascinating experience. Not speaking a word of Swedish turns out not to be the total barrier you might expect.

Sveriges Radio has run Pa Minuten since 1969, apart from a break for part of the 1980s. Like the BBC, it records two half-hour programmes in a single evening in front of an enthusiastic live audience which clearly adores being there.

There are slight differences. The BBC uses Chopin's Minute Waltz as theme music whereas the Swedes plumped for one of Spike Jones' comedy numbers - and they have an on-stage organist to add further musical moments along the way. Rather than a simple bell, the panellists interrupt with a personalised comedy sound effect.

But the core of the game remains what former BBC producer Ian Messiter came up with more than half a century ago.

Clement Freud Image copyright Sveriges Radio
Image caption The Bridge writer Hans Rosenfeldt has been chairman for the past four years

Four witty panellists are given topics to speak on for 60 seconds by a chairman and they try to do it without deviation, hesitation or repeating a word. Fellow panellists interrupt when they think a rule has been broken.

The topics the Swedish panel are given are more extended than in the BBC original. They included: "My suggestions for new road-signs", "Why my right shoe and left shoe smell different" and, "Contemporary writers I'd like to hit on the jaw".

For the last four seasons the chairman has been the writer Hans Rosenfeldt (previously a panellist). He's known outside Sweden as creator of hit Scandi-noir series The Bridge and also wrote two series of ITV's Marcella.

Contemporary Image copyright Sveriges Radio

He says part of the appeal of Pa Minuten is the obvious pleasure the panel take in playing off one another. "If you listen to the early programmes from the 1970s, I think the stories were the main thing - the things the players say when they have the subject. I understand that in those days everyone met before the taping and were given the subjects. So the players could always prepare a little."

"But as we play it now, Pa Minuten is probably more about the banter. I think it's really important that it's 100% improvised - the audience in the studio can feel that and I know people sense it listening at home.

"Also I think in radio habit is important. The programme goes out at 4pm on a Saturday and we have people in the audience whose parents and even grandparents have listened to us too. It's become a bit of Swedish life."

There are few details as to how Just A Minute crossed the North Sea. From 1951 Messiter's format had existed on the BBC Light Programme, in a different form, in a programme called One Minute, Please. Messiter left the BBC and took the format with him to South African radio, where for the first time he used the title Just A Minute.

In 1967, now a freelancer, he and Nicholas Parsons persuaded the BBC to relaunch the programme on the new Radio Four. His son Malcolm Messiter recalls his father returning from a trip to Sweden in 1969 having sold the format to Sveriges Radio, the nation's public broadcaster.

David Batra
Image caption Host Nicholas Parsons (front right) with frequent panellists Kenneth Williams (back right), Derek Nimmo (back centre) and Clement Freud (back left) are joined by show creator Ian Messiter in 1969

But radio is changing as quickly as any other medium. In the interval between the two recordings (when Sveriges Radio hands out copious free coffee and cinnamon buns) audience-members from 20 to 70 are delighted to explain in perfect English how much they love Pa Minuten.

The show clearly unites the generations but a major difference in how different age groups listen to the show emerges. For those under 35 what they're attending is essentially a podcast: many don't know or really care when the show is to go out on radio.

David Batra is a stand-up comic of mixed Swedish and Indian decent who's been a panel member for almost 20 years. (His wife Anne Marie Kinberg is an MP and former leader of Sweden's Moderate Party.) Batra grimaces as he recalls, "For the first couple of years I really sucked. Eventually I got better but it's a very hard game. People often say it doesn't matter who wins but I'm not sure that's true: I think it gives structure and provides a bit of tension. When I watch a gameshow on TV and there's no system of points, I think that's less fun.

funny comedian

"The main thing with Pa Minuten is fluency - it's a real test of how your brain works under pressure. That is a very, very hard thing for anyone to control. Being a really good writer or a very funny comedian helps but there are always three good performers ready to jump in front of you."

Despite his many trips to the UK, Rosenfeldt admits he's never heard an episode of Just A Minute. So I play him an extract.

He looks thoughtful. "It's interesting that in Britain I can hear them concentrating more than we do on the story-telling. And the topics are a bit broader than the ones our producer comes up with. And your chairman is 94 and he so obviously has it under total control. That's still not the case with me from time to time."

The recordings were taking place in Stockholm just before this month's General Election in Sweden. It wasn't mentioned in the programme but it was something people were talking about. Rosenfeldt says comic series like Pa Minuten are an important part of Swedish life.

"We're on Sweden's Programme 1, which is the main speech network. But there's not a lot of humour on it - it's just us and two other series. So we are 30 minutes of pure fun with the news and current affairs all around us. It's quite good to have us to balance all the seriousness up a bit."

instagram

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Related Topics

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Source Here: Just A Minute the Swedish way
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2627
Coke eyes cannabis-infused wellness drinks as market for CBD beverages expandshttps://ebookvault.biz/coke-eyes-cannabis-infused-wellness-drinks-as-market-for-cbd-beverages-expands/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 19:33:04 +0000 https://ebookvault.biz/?p=2623

Coca-Cola is looking at pitching cans of cannabis-infused wellness drinks to consumers in the latest bid by a big beverage behemoth to tackle the budding market for potentially potent enhanced potables.

“Along with many others in the beverage industry, we are closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD as an ingredient in functional wellness beverages around the world,” the company said in a statement issued in response to a report from the Canadian BNN Bloomberg new service.

BNN reported that Coca-Cola was in talks with cannabis producer Aurora Cannabis to make marijuana-infused wellness drinks. Aurora Cannabis did not confirm that it was in talks with Coke, but the company’s chief executive did acknowledge that it had been in conversation with several beverage makers over the last few months.

“I think it’s important to have a beverage, period,” said Aurora Cannabis chief executive Terry Booth in an interview with Bloomberg. “We can’t comment on speculation at this time… We’ve spoke [sic] to at least three different beverage companies in the space in the last three months.”

Drinks infused with either cannabinoids like CBD, which has medicinal, pain-relieving qualities, and THC, which gets users high, have become popular in states in the U.S. where the drug is legalized and in Canada where it has been fully decriminalized nationally.

Amy Ludlum

Portland’s Coalition Brewing has already introduced CBD-infused Two Flowers IPA, and big brands like Molson Coors announced a partnership with Hydropothecary to pursue cannabis-infused beverages.

Other big beer companies are going the direct route. Constellation Brands, which makes beers like Corona and Negro Modelo, along with whiskies, tequilas, vodkas and other boozy spirits, has invested $4 billion into Canopy Growth, another Canadian cannabis business.

Coke isn’t the first non-alcoholic soda maker to try a bud-based brew. That honor belongs to California Dreamin, a startup we covered that’s looking to bring cannabinoid drinks to market. The company, which launched from Y Combinator, is focused on a THC-based beverage.

As we wrote earlier this year:

Each bottle contains 10 milligrams of THC — an industry-standard dose of the psychoactive chemical in marijuana. The company only uses sativa, the more energizing, euphoric type of pot, compared to the more body-relaxing indica variety. That’s compared to some competing marijuana beverages with as much as 100mg — enough that a single sip will get you high and a bottle will lay out all but the hardiest stoners. “We want it to be a light, head high feel,” says Seven Cities Beverage Company aka California Dreamin’ co-founder Amy Ludlum. “We don’t want to give anyone couch lock. We want it to be social.”

The experiments in better sales through new chemistry come at a time when demand for both beer and bubbly sodas is slowing. Beer is being supplanted by booze and wine among American consumers (or a rising number of teetotalers are eating into sales of both). Meanwhile, sugary drinks also have seen their popularity dwindle as new consumers reach for the kombucha rather than the Coke.

Dabbling in the doobage also makes more sense as an increasing number of states push for legalization and our neighbor to the North doubles down on its full embrace of all things cannabis.

Reports of Coke’s interest sent shares of Aurora Cannabis up nearly 19 percent in trading on the OTC.

Aurora Cannabis

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Read More Here: Coke eyes cannabis-infused wellness drinks as market for CBD beverages expands
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Coca-Cola is looking at pitching cans of cannabis-infused wellness drinks to consumers in the latest bid by a big beverage behemoth to tackle the budding market for potentially potent enhanced potables.

“Along with many others in the beverage industry, we are closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD as an ingredient in functional wellness beverages around the world,” the company said in a statement issued in response to a report from the Canadian BNN Bloomberg new service.

BNN reported that Coca-Cola was in talks with cannabis producer Aurora Cannabis to make marijuana-infused wellness drinks. Aurora Cannabis did not confirm that it was in talks with Coke, but the company’s chief executive did acknowledge that it had been in conversation with several beverage makers over the last few months.

“I think it’s important to have a beverage, period,” said Aurora Cannabis chief executive Terry Booth in an interview with Bloomberg. “We can’t comment on speculation at this time… We’ve spoke [sic] to at least three different beverage companies in the space in the last three months.”

Drinks infused with either cannabinoids like CBD, which has medicinal, pain-relieving qualities, and THC, which gets users high, have become popular in states in the U.S. where the drug is legalized and in Canada where it has been fully decriminalized nationally.

Amy Ludlum

Portland’s Coalition Brewing has already introduced CBD-infused Two Flowers IPA, and big brands like Molson Coors announced a partnership with Hydropothecary to pursue cannabis-infused beverages.

Other big beer companies are going the direct route. Constellation Brands, which makes beers like Corona and Negro Modelo, along with whiskies, tequilas, vodkas and other boozy spirits, has invested $4 billion into Canopy Growth, another Canadian cannabis business.

Coke isn’t the first non-alcoholic soda maker to try a bud-based brew. That honor belongs to California Dreamin, a startup we covered that’s looking to bring cannabinoid drinks to market. The company, which launched from Y Combinator, is focused on a THC-based beverage.

As we wrote earlier this year:

Each bottle contains 10 milligrams of THC — an industry-standard dose of the psychoactive chemical in marijuana. The company only uses sativa, the more energizing, euphoric type of pot, compared to the more body-relaxing indica variety. That’s compared to some competing marijuana beverages with as much as 100mg — enough that a single sip will get you high and a bottle will lay out all but the hardiest stoners. “We want it to be a light, head high feel,” says Seven Cities Beverage Company aka California Dreamin’ co-founder Amy Ludlum. “We don’t want to give anyone couch lock. We want it to be social.”

The experiments in better sales through new chemistry come at a time when demand for both beer and bubbly sodas is slowing. Beer is being supplanted by booze and wine among American consumers (or a rising number of teetotalers are eating into sales of both). Meanwhile, sugary drinks also have seen their popularity dwindle as new consumers reach for the kombucha rather than the Coke.

Dabbling in the doobage also makes more sense as an increasing number of states push for legalization and our neighbor to the North doubles down on its full embrace of all things cannabis.

Reports of Coke’s interest sent shares of Aurora Cannabis up nearly 19 percent in trading on the OTC.

Aurora Cannabis

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Read More Here: Coke eyes cannabis-infused wellness drinks as market for CBD beverages expands
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2623
Tributes to ‘complete footballer’ Beattiehttps://ebookvault.biz/tributes-to-complete-footballer-beattie/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 15:00:53 +0000 https://ebookvault.biz/?p=2619
BBC Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Kevin Beattie won nine caps for England

Former team-mates and opponents have been paying tribute to ex-Ipswich and England defender Kevin Beattie, who has died from a suspected heart attack.

Former England captain Terry Butcher said he was "devastated" by the death of the 64-year-old.

"He was my hero and my inspiration," Butcher said. "You try to model yourself on him but it was impossible - he was the complete footballer."

George Burley, who won the FA Cup with Beattie, said he was "a legend".

Beattie was born in Carlisle and moved to Ipswich when he was 15, going on to make 296 starts for the club, scoring 32 goals. He was a PFA Young Player of the Year, represented England nine times and also won the Uefa Cup under Sir Bobby Robson.

He is widely considered by fans and former players of Ipswich to be the club's best-ever player.

Beattie Image Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Kevin Beattie, back row with arm raised, won the FA Cup with Ipswich Town in 1978

Sir Bobby, who died in 2009, said Beattie was the "best defensive player that this country has produced".

In his autobiography, Sir Bobby said he signed Beattie after scout Ron Gray described him as a "colossus" with a "neck like a bull".

Butcher said he first watched Beattie as a fan and idolised him throughout his career.

"I used to watch him from the terraces and marvel at his strength and ability," Butcher told BBC Radio Suffolk.

"He used to hurt people by simple tackles but he wasn't vicious, he was one of the loveliest men you'd meet on the pitch as well - he was a gentleman. But he was strong and wanted to win."

Beattie's career was hampered by injuries and it was all but over when he left Ipswich at the age of 28.

"He put his body on the line, and in the end his injuries helped other people, myself included, get in the team," Butcher said. "But you didn't want to get in the team because I just used to love watching him play.

"He had spring-like legs. His spring and timing was immaculate. When he went up to head the ball, nobody else was going to win it.

"When he used to shoot with his left foot it was like an Exocet."

Butcher
Image caption Kevin Beattie continued to live in Ipswich, caring for his wife
Captain Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Beattie was known for his aerial ability and strong left foot

George Burley said Beattie's athleticism and determination to win meant "nobody could play against him".

"He was quicker than anybody, stronger; he was fantastic in the air, he had a left foot that was like a sledgehammer - he virtually scored from the halfway line in one game," Burley said.

"And as a fella, Kev was one of these lads where if anyone was struggling, he'd come help you. If somebody needed £2 for a taxi, 'I'll give you it', anything like that.

"If anybody wanted something they'd go to Kevin, and Kevin took it all on himself and really enjoyed doing that. He was that type of lad."

complete footballer Image copyright Mark Murphy
Image caption Kevin Beattie was a regular on BBC Radio Suffolk and was on air on Saturday

Allan Hunter, whose partnership with Beattie earned them the nicknames "Bacon and Eggs" from Sir Bobby, said his former team-mate was a "fantastic fella and a fantastic player".

"He was the greatest thing I ever played with, and that includes George Best," the former Northern Ireland international said.

Mick Mills, who captained the FA Cup-winning side, said Beattie's death was a "desperately sad moment".

"There's no doubt we've lost our best player," Mills said. "The team was littered with good players, but I think everyone would say he was our best one.

"Not only was he a great player, if you wanted someone who was absolutely perfect for the dressing room, Kevin Beattie was your man. He was a laugh-a-minute and if there was any tomfoolery going on, he was part of it."

Roger Osborne, who scored the only goal in the FA Cup final against Arsenal, said it had been an "honour" to share the pitch with Beattie.

"Beat was quite annoying, really, because everything came so easy for him," Osborne said. "Us poorer players had to train really hard and work to keep our fitness. Beat used to stroll in and took it all for granted.

"He was just stronger, fitter and better than anyone else. He didn't have to try."

defensive player Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Ipswich beat West Brom to reach the FA Cup final in 1978

John Wark, part of the FA Cup and Uefa Cup-winning sides, said Beattie, lovingly called "Monster" by his team-mates, was "the best-ever" player for Ipswich.

"We had a lot of other great players but Beat was the one they couldn't get by in the European games," he said. "His downfall was his injuries."

Former opponents and more recent players also paid tribute to Beattie, with ex-Manchester United, England and Millwall winger Gordon Hill calling him "a true gentleman and fantastic centre-half".

And ex-Ipswich captain and Republic of Ireland midfielder Matt Holland called him "one of the greatest" Town players of all time.

Beattie was loved by fans and fellow professionals for his personality as much as his playing ability, with many of his team-mates describing him as a joker. Other stories paint him as a slightly hapless character, with Sir Bobby saying "trouble seemed to find him easily".

In his autobiography, Sir Bobby recalled how Beattie once threw a can of petrol on a bonfire that had failed to light. From his hospital bed, Beattie told his manager he was "all right" and that he would be able to play the following day, but it turned out he was absent for the next five months.

"He was blessed and cursed at the same time," Sir Bobby wrote. "Blessed with talent and cursed by bad luck."

Beattie broke his arm in what proved to be his last match for Ipswich, a 1-0 defeat to Manchester City in the semi-final of the FA Cup in 1981.

He had short spells with Middlesbrough and Colchester after leaving Ipswich, but returned to the town to live after retiring. He led a modest life, caring for his wife Maggie, who has multiple sclerosis, in a council-owned bungalow.

In 2012, speaking shortly after he admitted falsely claiming benefits, Beattie said more could be done to help former players who had fallen on hard times.

He also reflected on whether injections to help him recover quickly from injuries had shortened his career.

"Football is the love of my life," he said. "I've let myself down in a way, saying yes to injections and stuff like that. But I've got my memories and you can't take that away."

Mark Murphy's Breakfast show on BBC Radio Suffolk was dedicated to Kevin Beattie and featured tributes from several former team-mates as well as fans. You can listen again via the iPlayer.

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Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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BBC Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Kevin Beattie won nine caps for England

Former team-mates and opponents have been paying tribute to ex-Ipswich and England defender Kevin Beattie, who has died from a suspected heart attack.

Former England captain Terry Butcher said he was "devastated" by the death of the 64-year-old.

"He was my hero and my inspiration," Butcher said. "You try to model yourself on him but it was impossible - he was the complete footballer."

George Burley, who won the FA Cup with Beattie, said he was "a legend".

Beattie was born in Carlisle and moved to Ipswich when he was 15, going on to make 296 starts for the club, scoring 32 goals. He was a PFA Young Player of the Year, represented England nine times and also won the Uefa Cup under Sir Bobby Robson.

He is widely considered by fans and former players of Ipswich to be the club's best-ever player.

Beattie Image Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Kevin Beattie, back row with arm raised, won the FA Cup with Ipswich Town in 1978

Sir Bobby, who died in 2009, said Beattie was the "best defensive player that this country has produced".

In his autobiography, Sir Bobby said he signed Beattie after scout Ron Gray described him as a "colossus" with a "neck like a bull".

Butcher said he first watched Beattie as a fan and idolised him throughout his career.

"I used to watch him from the terraces and marvel at his strength and ability," Butcher told BBC Radio Suffolk.

"He used to hurt people by simple tackles but he wasn't vicious, he was one of the loveliest men you'd meet on the pitch as well - he was a gentleman. But he was strong and wanted to win."

Beattie's career was hampered by injuries and it was all but over when he left Ipswich at the age of 28.

"He put his body on the line, and in the end his injuries helped other people, myself included, get in the team," Butcher said. "But you didn't want to get in the team because I just used to love watching him play.

"He had spring-like legs. His spring and timing was immaculate. When he went up to head the ball, nobody else was going to win it.

"When he used to shoot with his left foot it was like an Exocet."

Butcher
Image caption Kevin Beattie continued to live in Ipswich, caring for his wife
Captain Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Beattie was known for his aerial ability and strong left foot

George Burley said Beattie's athleticism and determination to win meant "nobody could play against him".

"He was quicker than anybody, stronger; he was fantastic in the air, he had a left foot that was like a sledgehammer - he virtually scored from the halfway line in one game," Burley said.

"And as a fella, Kev was one of these lads where if anyone was struggling, he'd come help you. If somebody needed £2 for a taxi, 'I'll give you it', anything like that.

"If anybody wanted something they'd go to Kevin, and Kevin took it all on himself and really enjoyed doing that. He was that type of lad."

complete footballer Image copyright Mark Murphy
Image caption Kevin Beattie was a regular on BBC Radio Suffolk and was on air on Saturday

Allan Hunter, whose partnership with Beattie earned them the nicknames "Bacon and Eggs" from Sir Bobby, said his former team-mate was a "fantastic fella and a fantastic player".

"He was the greatest thing I ever played with, and that includes George Best," the former Northern Ireland international said.

Mick Mills, who captained the FA Cup-winning side, said Beattie's death was a "desperately sad moment".

"There's no doubt we've lost our best player," Mills said. "The team was littered with good players, but I think everyone would say he was our best one.

"Not only was he a great player, if you wanted someone who was absolutely perfect for the dressing room, Kevin Beattie was your man. He was a laugh-a-minute and if there was any tomfoolery going on, he was part of it."

Roger Osborne, who scored the only goal in the FA Cup final against Arsenal, said it had been an "honour" to share the pitch with Beattie.

"Beat was quite annoying, really, because everything came so easy for him," Osborne said. "Us poorer players had to train really hard and work to keep our fitness. Beat used to stroll in and took it all for granted.

"He was just stronger, fitter and better than anyone else. He didn't have to try."

defensive player Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Ipswich beat West Brom to reach the FA Cup final in 1978

John Wark, part of the FA Cup and Uefa Cup-winning sides, said Beattie, lovingly called "Monster" by his team-mates, was "the best-ever" player for Ipswich.

"We had a lot of other great players but Beat was the one they couldn't get by in the European games," he said. "His downfall was his injuries."

Former opponents and more recent players also paid tribute to Beattie, with ex-Manchester United, England and Millwall winger Gordon Hill calling him "a true gentleman and fantastic centre-half".

And ex-Ipswich captain and Republic of Ireland midfielder Matt Holland called him "one of the greatest" Town players of all time.

Beattie was loved by fans and fellow professionals for his personality as much as his playing ability, with many of his team-mates describing him as a joker. Other stories paint him as a slightly hapless character, with Sir Bobby saying "trouble seemed to find him easily".

In his autobiography, Sir Bobby recalled how Beattie once threw a can of petrol on a bonfire that had failed to light. From his hospital bed, Beattie told his manager he was "all right" and that he would be able to play the following day, but it turned out he was absent for the next five months.

"He was blessed and cursed at the same time," Sir Bobby wrote. "Blessed with talent and cursed by bad luck."

Beattie broke his arm in what proved to be his last match for Ipswich, a 1-0 defeat to Manchester City in the semi-final of the FA Cup in 1981.

He had short spells with Middlesbrough and Colchester after leaving Ipswich, but returned to the town to live after retiring. He led a modest life, caring for his wife Maggie, who has multiple sclerosis, in a council-owned bungalow.

In 2012, speaking shortly after he admitted falsely claiming benefits, Beattie said more could be done to help former players who had fallen on hard times.

He also reflected on whether injections to help him recover quickly from injuries had shortened his career.

"Football is the love of my life," he said. "I've let myself down in a way, saying yes to injections and stuff like that. But I've got my memories and you can't take that away."

Mark Murphy's Breakfast show on BBC Radio Suffolk was dedicated to Kevin Beattie and featured tributes from several former team-mates as well as fans. You can listen again via the iPlayer.

Related Topics

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Force to double Taser-trained officershttps://ebookvault.biz/force-to-double-taser-trained-officers/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 10:39:42 +0000 https://ebookvault.biz/?p=2615
Assistant Chief Constable Image copyright EPA
Image caption The use of a Taser is often misunderstood, says South Wales Police and Crime Commissioner Alun Michael

A police force is set to double the number of officers it has trained to use Tasers in response to drug gangs increasingly carrying weapons.

South Wales Police said it would train an additional 281 officers over the next 12 months, taking the proportion of trained officers up from 10% to 20%

It follows a review by the force into the best ways for officers to protect the public and themselves.

North Wales Police and Gwent Police are also training more officers.

Dyfed-Powys Police has been asked to comment.

South Wales Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Alun Michael said: "The use of a Taser is often misunderstood and misrepresented so it's important to stress that - properly used - it is a means of preventing injury, not of causing injury.

"I am very confident that the use of Taser by our officers is proportionate and frequently prevents harm."

Assistant Chief Constable Jeremy Vaughan added: "On average, South Wales Police officers are subjected to around nine assaults each week, which sadly include kicking, biting, punching and spitting.

"In addition, we are aware of growing evidence that gangs linked to drugs trafficking and County Lines activity are increasingly likely to be carrying weapons.

"We intend to be ready should these trends have an increasing impact in our area."

The force said it did not anticipate there being a significant increase in the amount of times Tasers were discharged.

It said last year Tasers were deployed in 227 cases but discharged in 16 instances.

North Wales Police said it had recently increased the number of officers trained to use a Taser from 240 to 300.

In August the force's PCC Arfon Jones said the number of attacks against officers was "contemptible" and said he wanted the majority of frontline officers in his force to be armed with Tasers to protect themselves.

Gwent Police also said it had increased the number of specially trained Taser officers in response to "ever-changing policing challenges" but could not disclose exact numbers due to operational sensitivity.

In October one of its officers, PC Rhydian Jones, was attacked by a man with two kitchen knives. He later said he owed his life to his stab-proof vest and the Taser his colleague had been armed with.

Related Topics

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Assistant Chief Constable Image copyright EPA
Image caption The use of a Taser is often misunderstood, says South Wales Police and Crime Commissioner Alun Michael

A police force is set to double the number of officers it has trained to use Tasers in response to drug gangs increasingly carrying weapons.

South Wales Police said it would train an additional 281 officers over the next 12 months, taking the proportion of trained officers up from 10% to 20%

It follows a review by the force into the best ways for officers to protect the public and themselves.

North Wales Police and Gwent Police are also training more officers.

Dyfed-Powys Police has been asked to comment.

South Wales Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Alun Michael said: "The use of a Taser is often misunderstood and misrepresented so it's important to stress that - properly used - it is a means of preventing injury, not of causing injury.

"I am very confident that the use of Taser by our officers is proportionate and frequently prevents harm."

Assistant Chief Constable Jeremy Vaughan added: "On average, South Wales Police officers are subjected to around nine assaults each week, which sadly include kicking, biting, punching and spitting.

"In addition, we are aware of growing evidence that gangs linked to drugs trafficking and County Lines activity are increasingly likely to be carrying weapons.

"We intend to be ready should these trends have an increasing impact in our area."

The force said it did not anticipate there being a significant increase in the amount of times Tasers were discharged.

It said last year Tasers were deployed in 227 cases but discharged in 16 instances.

North Wales Police said it had recently increased the number of officers trained to use a Taser from 240 to 300.

In August the force's PCC Arfon Jones said the number of attacks against officers was "contemptible" and said he wanted the majority of frontline officers in his force to be armed with Tasers to protect themselves.

Gwent Police also said it had increased the number of specially trained Taser officers in response to "ever-changing policing challenges" but could not disclose exact numbers due to operational sensitivity.

In October one of its officers, PC Rhydian Jones, was attacked by a man with two kitchen knives. He later said he owed his life to his stab-proof vest and the Taser his colleague had been armed with.

Related Topics

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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